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Join The UtahRunning.com Racing Team

Unless you’re still in high school or college, the opportunity to be a part of a running team is hard to find.  For us, some of our favorite running experiences have more to do with the teammates or the people we experienced them with than with the actual running we did.  Our time spent on teams has shown that being a part of a group can help bring out the best in an individual as each member strives to help contribute to the goals of the whole team.  There is something about being a part of something bigger than ourselves that gives us a sense of purpose, direction, and belonging.  And, let’s face it; running with others makes it a heck of a lot more fun to pound that pavement (or trail)!

For the last couple of years UtahRunning.com has put together an Elite Racing Team.  We’ve been blow away with how much fun being on a team has been and how much having others to race and train with has helped take team members’ race performance to the next level.

That is why in 2016, in addition to our Elite Racing Team, we are creating a racing team for individuals that are looking to be a part of something A-M-A-Z-I-N-G…The UtahRunning.com Racing Team!!

If you are interested in joining our
UtahRunning.com Racing Team,
Here are the requirements:

Submit a race result time (5k, 10k, half marathon, marathon) that is in the 70th percentile or above when age-graded (race result must be within the last two years)
— “How do I know if my race result is in the 70th percentile or above when age-graded?”… Go to this Age-Grade Calculator to calculate your result (http://www.heartbreakhill.org/age_graded.htm)

Willing to participate in at least 6 Utah races throughout the year wearing the highly visible, super-duper fast looking, UtahRunning.com Racing Tank

Pay Team Fee of $20

Team Application:
To apply to be a part of the UtahRunning.com Racing Team fill out the application below…
UtahRunning.com 2016 Racing Team Application

What are the benefits of being on the team?

 Technical Racing Tank

 Camaraderie among teammates, support system, motivation to perform to the best of your ability to help achieve the goals of the team

 Access to advice from Elite Team Members via Facebook Group Page

 Recognition, notoriety, and the opportunity to represent a group that holds themselves to a high standard

 Opportunity to participate in team activities and group runs

 Opportunity to attend the Kick-off Party and End of Year Awards Banquet

 Discounted pricing for UtahRunning.com races and Free entrance into UtahRunning.com clinics

Join UtahRunning.com Racing Team today and prepare yourself for the FUN and SUCCESS you will find as you rub shoulders with the best running/racing group Utah has to offer!

UtahRunning.com 2016 Racing Team Application

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Can Runners Benefit from The Paleo Diet?


By Rodney Hansen

In my first article of Return of a Has Been Runner, my fifth tip addressed adequate nutrition and avoiding fad diets, detox, and restrictive diets.  A popular restrictive diet that many runners are trying is Paleolithic Nutrition, the Paleo Diet, or the “Caveman Diet.”  The basis of this diet is that the present day human needs to eat like our ancestors did 10,000 years ago.

The basic claim of Paleolithic Nutrition is that we humans are not designed or have not evolved to eat the present day foods, especially foods produced through conventional farming.  Read More….

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by on Dec.07, 2015, under Utah Running

Female Runner Spotlight

Lauren Morin

Age:    24

Current residence: Ogden, UT

Occupation: Striders Running Manager

Running background: After watching my parents complete several marathons, I was inspired to start running after high school. I figured I needed a way to stay fit post cheerleading days.

PR’s: Marathon 3:30;  Ogden Valley 50 Miler (Road 50) 8:55; Skyline 50 Miler (Trail 50) 12:26;

Wasatch Front 100 (29:34) 

Tell us about your recent experience completing your first 100 miles at the Wasatch 100.  What were some of the highlights?  What parts or aspects of the race were most challenging? How did crossing the finish line completing 100 miles compare to the feeling of finishing shorter distance races? Read More….

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by on Dec.07, 2015, under Utah Running

Interview with Golden Harper

Golden Harper
Local Utah running prodigy and entrepreneur, Golden Harper, is one of the founders of Altra Running Shoes, the first cushioned Zero Drop™ running shoes on the market (cushioning in the shoe no longer dropping from the heel down to forefoot).  What started as a small startup company in 2009, has turned into a thriving establishment and an explosion of a new line of running shoes. Read More….

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by on Dec.07, 2015, under Utah Running

Build An Aerobic Base: A Guide for Off-Season Training

[Originally featured in Run Utah Magazine Oct Nov Dec Edition 2015 – Click Here to read other great articles from this magazine edition]

The fall and winter months are a great time of year to put in some easy running mileage. In fact, it is my favorite time of year because I feel like I can really enjoy running again. The pressure of a race looming in the near future is gone and I can focus on running because I love what it does for both my mind and body. Some runners like to continue to do intervals, tempos, etc. during these off-season months, but if your goal is to increase your weekly mileage and build a solid aerobic base then the safest way to go about it is to avoid coupling mileage increases with intense workouts. You risk injury, overtraining, and burnout. For me it works best to at least take a couple months to run distance and build up my mileage base. If anything, it is the mental break from intense workouts that I need to be primed and ready to jump back into more intense workouts come the beginning of the year.


There are some definite physiological benefits to spending consistent time running easy mileage. We strengthen the cardiovascular system. We create a more powerful pump (heart), which helps get more oxygen rich blood to our running muscles at an increased rate. We increase the cross-section of blood supply in our muscles with the increased number of capillaries (small branches of blood vessels) in our body. We also increase the size, number, and distribution of mitochondria in our body. Mitochondria is where aerobic metabolism takes place, so this increases our body’s ability to take up and utilize oxygen more efficiently. In addition to the cardiovascular benefits, we can become better at conserving our glycogen stores and be more efficient at utilizing fat for energy. Base mileage, if done correctly, also helps build up a resistance to injury and builds a foundation for us to handle more intense/ quality workouts down the road. And if you are still not convinced of the importance of easy running and base mileage, think about how the different energy pathways of the body are utilized during different race distances. We have energy being produced with the presence of oxygen (aerobic pathway) and energy produced with out oxygen (anaerobic pathways) depending on the intensity of the activity being performed. If you take a look at the energy contribution chart you can see that even a shorter race like the mile requires 80% of the body’s energy to come from aerobic metabolism. The marathon requires over 97% from the aerobic pathway! So it makes sense that we should spend 80% or more of our training time developing our aerobic system.


When it comes to weekly mileage goals, like a lot of training aspects, it is very individual. I know some runners that run consistent 100 mile weeks, some runners who 65 miles per week is their edge, and other beginner or masters (over 40 years old) runners that 30-40 miles a week are what their bodies can handle. So many factors go into this that it is something you have to be very careful about. Jack Daniels, a well-known exercise physiologist and coach, said there is no magical weekly mileage number. He did say, however, that good marathoners tend to be in the 70-150 miles per week average (1). This is a wide range, but it does help us understand that for marathon running, longer weekly mileage is important. While the exact ideal weekly mileage for each person is not always clear, one thing we do know is that it takes YEARS to build up to having your body handle the stresses of 70-150 mile weeks. Runners that are able to handle this amount of mileage have built up to this gradually over years of training. So when deciding on how many miles to do each week, consider what event you are training for (training for a 5K is going to require much less miles than if you are training for a marathon) and then consider how many years you have been running. I’d say if you are just getting started then shoot for 25-35 miles a week. If you are an intermediate runner (3-5 years of running) that has consistently been running 25-35 miles a week then start your base mileage out at the 35-45 range. If you have been running for 7-10 years with consistent mileage above 50 miles then I think you would be okay to start hitting ranges above 60.


The most conservative, safest approach would be to stay at the same weekly mileage for 3-4 weeks before increasing your mileage. This gives your body time to adapt to the stresses you are putting on it before you add more demand to it. I like to take a mileage recovery week before making the jump to a new weekly mileage goal. So after the 3rd or 4th week of higher mileage, I drop my mileage for one week by 20% and allow myself a recovery week from the higher mileage. For example, if you are running 60 miles a week for 3 weeks then on the recovery week you would decrease your mileage by 12 miles (20% of 60) and run 48 miles. Then after the recovery week you could head into three consecutive weeks at 66 miles a week. How do I know how much I increase my mileage when it is time to make a jump? Some experts recommend, using the 10% rule of thumb. This means increasing your mileage by 10% of what you have been doing, but maximum amount being 10 miles. Another approach is to increase by the number of training sessions you are doing in a week (1). So if you workout 7 times a week, then you can increase your mileage by 7 miles.


These easy distance runs are more of a function of time spent running rather than intensity (1). You can’t really go too slow on these runs, but you can go too fast. If you go too fast on these runs you change the desired result and purpose of the run. I would describe these runs as easy to moderate. At a conversational pace. If you are looking for a heart rate range, your distance run pace should be 65-79% of your heart rate max. If you want to base easy run pace off of race paces you can do that too. For instance, these runs should be 45-60 seconds slower per mile than marathon race pace or 1.5-2 minutes slower than 5k pace (1).


(1) Daniels, Jack (2005). Daniel’s Running Formula. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.


Janae Richardson – Runner | USATF Certified Coach | Masters in Exercise Science

Janae has a master’s degree in Exercise Science from Utah State University and is a Certified Sports Nutritionist. She ran collegiately at Weber State University and continues to enjoy running competitively in road races. As a certified USATF coach she also enjoys coaching runners of all levels of ability. Janae and her husband Ken Co-founded UtahRunning.com in 2009 and reside in Ogden, UT with their three children.


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How to Tackle the Marathon

The marathon can be a fickle beast, but with some experience, wise training, and prudent in-race decision making, it can be tamed. I consider myself a seasoned runner but, when I stepped on the road for my first marathon I was in for a rude awakening. I had underestimated the toll 26.2 miles puts on your body, especially at race pace, and I had not respected the distance as I should have. I’ve since run a few more marathons, and although I’m still seeking faster times, I have improved my performance substantially. I’d like to share a few tips that I’ve found useful for improving my marathon performance.

There’s No Substitute for Mileage

Over the last few years I steadily increased my weekly mileage as I continued to be disappointed in my marathon performances. With each increase in mileage I, for the most part, saw an improvement in my marathon PR. There’s certainly a strong correlation between the number of miles we run in training and our marathon race performance. Increasing volume at first was a scary and tough decision for me. I endured three stress fractures in college, due to increasing volume and training load too quickly. I was under the impression my body couldn’t handle more miles. But I made the decision to increase mileage and I did so very slowly over time.

To increase your mileage I recommend an average of five miles per week for each training block. For example, if you are trained 12-16 weeks for a marathon and averaged 50 miles a week during that block, consider attempting 55 miles per week on your next 12-16 week block. This is a safe way to increase without jeopardizing an injury, but as always listen to your body and back off if you fear you’re overdoing it.

Slowing Down to Speed Up

Around the same time I decided to increase my mileage I also decreased the pace of my easy and recovery day runs. By slowing down on my easy days I was able to improve my half marathon PR by 2 minutes and my marathon PR by 8 minutes. Going slower allows me to run more miles and to be better recovered for my hard workout days. When we run a hard workout we cause micro-tears in our muscles and these, if given time, will adapt and heal stronger than before. This is how we get faster and stronger. But, if we push the pace the day after a hard workout, we may not be allowing the muscles to fully heal and adapt before we tear them down again in the next workout.

Another benefit of slower running on easy days is that your body becomes more accustomed to using fat as an energy source. At faster paces we mainly use glycogen as our energy source. But, in the marathon we often need fat in addition to glycogen as an energy source, especially late in the race when glycogen levels have been nearly depleted.

What’s a good easy day pace? That depends on how hard you ran the day before. But it’s not uncommon for my recovery pace to be 2:30 slower per mile than the pace I ran my hard workout at. Then if I have an additional easy day before my next workout I may go 1:45-2:00 slower per mile. But mostly I don’t even look at my watch during recovery runs, I just run whatever pace feels easy and at which I feel my body will recover.

Read More….

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