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Race Day Preparation

Pre-Race Preparation

No matter how hard you train, the days leading up to a race can make or break your performance. There is no one proven way to prepare for a race or big workout, so keep in mind that some, all, or none of these strategies may be beneficial to you. The following are some of the most successful approaches to race day.

Tapering: In the days leading up to a race, cut back on the length and intensity of your run. For some, it is mentally difficult to ease up during runs leading up to a race for the fear of “losing fitness”, but keep in mind that a few days out from a race you are already as fit as you’re going be for that race. You don’t have anything to gain from running faster or farther, but you have a lot to lose. Enjoy some easy runs and focus on the race ahead.

Nutrition: This is probably the hardest aspect of race day preparation to master. It is very individualistic, so tweaking the following ideas to fit what you know your stomach can handle while running is encouraged. Your mindset towards food as a runner should be something resembling “calories equal energy”. This doesn’t mean you should go eat a dozen donuts, however, not all calories are created equal. As you become accustomed to racing you will start to learn how much food you need to be properly fueled for the upcoming race. When fueling for a race, the majority of your diet should be complex carbohydrates (roughly 55-65% of your caloric intake). Common meals for runners to eat the night before the race that aren’t too hard on the stomach that also includes high amounts of complex carbohydrates are baked potatoes, rice, and pasta (ideally with a red sauce). What you should eat on race day is very dependent on when your race time is. We advise that you shouldn’t try anything new on race day experiment with what works for you on days when you workout, not on race days when you have more at stake. Aside from what to eat, don’t eat any meals too close to your race. If you haven’t made this mistake yet you are either very lucky or know your stuff, but if you have made the mistake of eating too close to a race, you will never forget it. As a guideline, most runners need at least three hours between their last small meal and their race, and many need even longer. Last tip for nutrition: make sure you stay hydrated! No matter what the temperature is going to be on race day, being hydrated helps your body run more efficiently. It impacts a lot more than just temperature regulation, it also impacts your bodies ability to deliver oxygen to your muscles, among other things.

Read More….

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Six Tips to Losing Weight

by: Meaghan Fors

There is a lot of different and conflicting information on the web when it comes to dieting. Almost everyone has a brother, mother, aunt, or friend-of-a-friend who tried a miracle diet, and it “helped them lose 50 lbs”! While most of the diets we hear about sound sensational, how do you know if it will work for you? How do you know if it’s even safe? We’ve done some research on the subject, and we’re here to share with you what we’ve learned!

  1.      What worked for your brother, mother, aunt, or friend-of-a-friend might not work for you.

 

And that’s okay! The more that studies are being conducted on weight-loss and dieting, the more scientists are finding that different bodies respond to diets differently. Weight loss, and the process of losing weight, is very individualistic. Depending on your genes and cellular make-up, your body may respond better to one diet over another. What worked wonders for someone else might result in you ending up the same weight or even gaining weight. It’s okay to have trial and error periods where you figure out what works best for you and your body.

 

  1.      Be realistic about cutting calories.

 

You are far more likely to succeed if you reduce your calories slowly and consistently. The best way to cut calories is to track what you eat for a week and find your average daily caloric intake. Then, reduce your caloric intake (what you eat) everyday by 10-15%. For example, if you eat 2,000 calories a day on average, reduce your calories by 200-300. If you eat 1700 calories, reduce your daily intake by 170-250. Your weight loss results will be slow and steady with this method, but you won’t run the risk of starving yourself and rebounding/binging when your body needs more nutrients. Generally losing 1-2 lbs a week is a good goal. Remember that one lb of weight loss is equivalent to a net loss of 3,500 calories.

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by on Jun.13, 2018, under Nutrition

NCAA Track and Field Championships 2018 Utah Distance Schedule

This week is the culmination of a fantastic Track and Field season for Utah collegiate athletes. The NCAA Track and Field Championships held up in Oregon at historic Hayward Field is held this week, likely for the last time with the current stadium as it is set to be rebuilt over the next few years. This year is also a very competitive year for Utah athletes. You wont want to miss these races as several athletes are in a good position to bring home a national title. All the races can be watched live via ESPN2. We have outlined the schedule for our distance athletes below!

Wednesday 6/6/18

Mens 1500m semifinal 5:46 p.m.

Mens Steeplechase Semifinal 6:02 p.m.

-Clayson Shumway, BYU

-Spencer Fehlberg, Utah State

-Jordan Cross, Weber State

-Matt Owens, BYU

Mens 800m semifinal 7:14 p.m.

-Clay Lambourne, Utah State

Mens 10,000m final 8:08 p.m.

-Clayton Young, BYU

-Connor McMillan, BYU

-Mike Tate, Southern Utah

Dillon Maggard, Utah State

-Rory Linkletter, BYU

-Connor Mantz, BYU

Thursday 6/7/18

Womens 1500m semifinal 5:16 p.m.

-Whittni Orton, BYU

Womens Steeplechase semifinal 5:32 p.m.

-Grayson Murphy, Utah

-Cierra Simmons, Utah State

Womens 800m semifinal 6:44 p.m.

Womens 10,000 final 7:38 p.m.

Friday 6/8/18

Mens 1500m final 6:42 p.m.

Mens Steeplechase final 6:54 p.m.

Mens 800m final 7:44 p.m.

Mens 5000m final 8:25 p.m.

-Rory Linkletter, BYU

-Dillon Maggard, Utah State

-Connor McMillan, BYU

-Clayton Young, BYU

Saturday 6/9/18

Womens 1500m final 4:41 p.m.

Womens Steeplechase final 4:54 p.m.

Womens 800m final 5:44 p.m.

Womens 5000m final 6:25 p.m.

 

 

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by on Jun.04, 2018, under College Running

Lots-O-Protein Chicken Salad

by Lisa VanDyke

*Article originally featured in Run Utah Magazine Spring Edition 2018.  Click HERE to download Full PDF version of the Magazine.

This is a great dish that is fresh and filling, and can be served many ways. It packs a punch with lots of protein to keep you feeling satisfied as well as aid in muscle repair.

It is also a meal you can make with leftovers! Sometimes I will purposely cook an extra chicken breast for my Sunday meal in the crockpot, and save it for Monday’s chicken salad. Quinoa is a food that preserves well in the freezer, so I will often take one cup portions of this grain and freeze them in sandwich baggies for future meals. It thaws quickly and has no texture differences after freezing, the way that rice or pasta can.

Recipe:

1 chicken breast, cooked, cooled, and chopped

1 cup Quinoa

1 small avocado, cut in cubes

¼ cup  plain or greek yogurt

2 green onion stalks, chopped

2 T chopped fresh cilantro

Juice of half a lemon

Mix all ingredients. Don’t worry if the avocado mashes into the salad. It’s delicious that way! Serve on a bed of greens, with Wasa crackers, or rolled up in a whole wheat tortilla. Plan to use day of, or next day, as the avocado oxidizes.





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Runner Spotlight: Donna Corcoran & Meg Nilson

Meet Donna Corcoran, 63, training for her first half marathon! She is a transplant from the east coast, and says she fell in love with the climate and the views in Utah. She takes full advantage of the natural beauty Northern Utah has to offer by skiing, golfing, cycling, or running on a daily basis.

She ran a 5k a couple of years ago, and since then has decided to go further. The 2018 Ogden Half Marathon is her goal race, and she is looking forward to some gentle downhill through the scenic Ogden Canyon. She is preparing by following a plan, and paying attention to all the details. She also has a 10K scheduled in the middle of her training cycle to gauge her preparedness.Her support system includes some great friends, as well as her husband who has run several marathons himself. She is also quite versed in finding social support online, and loves to hear the personal experiences of others who have completed 13.1 races. One of her strategies for getting her training runs done is running to her appointments. There is no turning back when you have somewhere to be!

“It’s not all about running distances but also cross training and resting as well warmups and cool downs to avoid injuries. I also do a lot of yoga.“ -Donna Corcoran



Runner Spotlight: Meg Nilson

Meg Nilsson, 36, is also racing a new distance – a 50 miler! She is making her step up to the ultra distance at the Bryce Canyon Ultra Events in June. After running a handful of road marathons, Meg found she was drawn to trails. She was not really planning on racing again, but in February 2017 her mom passed away, and Meg fell into a depression. She decided she needed a new goal to work toward, and convinced her brother to sign up for the race with her.

She is preparing by running 5-6 days a week, running back-to-back long runs, hills, weekly speed workouts, and some weight conditioning. So far on her journey, although the BTB long runs are “killer”, she has found that time outside to be healing. She stated, “there are not a lot of problems that can’t be thought through in 4.5 hours on a trail by yourself, and I can still do hard things.”

She is still building her certitude in completing the new distance, and said, “I’m not totally confident I can finish yet and I think that is a good thing. That was sort of the point for me picking a longer distance. I need to be nervous so I keep training hard.”

Megan’s journey to running, and even walking, has not been easy. At the age of just two, she was diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis. After having her first child, she was in constant pain and required the aid of a cane to walk. After five years of of searching, she was finally able to find a doctor who could help her control the disorder. She remembers crying tears of joy the first time she was able to jog down her block. She also remembers Mile 24 of her first marathon; a moment of severe pain but also intense gratuity that the pain was for a reason. Running has given her strength and control over her body.

“Trying for something much harder than you think you are capable of can be validating all by itself.” -Megan Nilsson




 

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by on Apr.24, 2018, under Utah Running

Run Utah Magazine Spring 2018

Download the Full PDF version of Run Utah Magazine Spring 2018 Edition HERE!



Training & Racing: Tips for Stepping Up to a New Race Distance

by Lisa VanDyke

I sat down with the Wasatch Running Center crew in Centerville, and got some expert opinions on how to prepare for a new, longer race distance:

When stepping up to a longer race distance, the basics of running stay the same. Following a plan and building up incrementally, recovering well between hard training efforts, and training your mind to see the finish line are all of utmost importance. The longer the distance, the more variables that come into play. Small issues that may cause minor annoyance on a 5k or 10k, can wreak havoc on a longer distance race. READ MORE



Health Nutrition: Lots-O-Protein Chicken Salad

by Lisa VanDyke

This is a great dish that is fresh and filling, and can be served many ways. It packs a punch with lots of protein to keep you feeling satisfied as well as aid in muscle repair.

It is also a meal you can make with leftovers! Sometimes I will purposely cook an extra chicken breast for my Sunday meal in the crockpot, and save it for Monday’s chicken salad. Quinoa is a food that preserves well in the freezer, so I will often take one cup portions of this grain and freeze them in sandwich baggies for future meals. It thaws quickly and has no texture differences after freezing, the way that rice or pasta can… READ MORE



Injury Prevention: #1 Exercise Routine that Every Runner Should Know – Prevent Injuries, Eliminate Pain, Run Forever!

by Janae Richardson

In 1996, Paul Pilkington found himself in Mexico.  By this point in Paul’s running career, he had made quite a name for himself.  Originally from a small town in Idaho, Paul had run track at Southern Idaho and then eventually at Weber State in Ogden, UT, where he earned All-American honors in the steeplechase.  After college he began teaching and coaching and supplemented his teacher salary by winning prize money in road races. He stepped onto the world-class scene when he won both the Houston Marathon in 1990 and the Los Angeles marathon in 1994.  He ultimately ended up being a four-time Olympic Trials qualifier and in 1995 was a member of the United States Track and Field Team representing the United States at the World Championships in Gothenburg Sweden. At this point in his career, Paul had gone to Mexico to train with Mark Plaatjes, who was the World Champion in the marathon in 1993.  Both of them were training hard as they prepared for the next marathon Olympic Trials. As they met up on this one particular day for another intense training session, Paul couldn’t help but complain to his training partner about the pain in his hamstring that had been lingering for several days now. Mark, who was also a physical therapist, said he had a hip alignment exercise that many were using in their PT clinics that would maybe help.  So, he had Paul lay down on this back while he pulled and tugged on his leg in a few unique ways before having Paul stand back up. Paul felt some immediate relief in his hamstring and within a few days everything felt back to normal… READ MORE



Runner Spotlight: Donna Corcoran

Meet Donna Corcoran, 63, training for her first half marathon! She is a transplant from the east coast, and says she fell in love with the climate and the views in Utah. She takes full advantage of the natural beauty Northern Utah has to offer by skiing, golfing, cycling, or running on a daily basis. She ran a 5k a couple of years ago, and since then has decided to go further… READ MORE



Runner Spotlight: Meg Nilson

Meg Nilsson, 36, is also racing a new distance – a 50 miler! She is making her step up to the ultra distance at the Bryce Canyon Ultra Events in June. After running a handful of road marathons, Meg found she was drawn to trails. She was not really planning on racing again, but in February 2017 her mom passed away, and Meg fell into a depression. She decided she needed a new goal to work toward, and convinced her brother to sign up for the race with her.

She is preparing by running 5-6 days a week, running back-to-back long runs, hills, weekly speed workouts, and some weight conditioning…READ MORE

 





 

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