Hello. Join Utahrunning.com, it’s FREE | Sign in | Sign in

Your Run Starts Here!

Shoes: Function or Fashion

“Are my shoes cute?”  A question you may have asked yourself, or have been asked by someone else. Or possibly you have pondered the questions, “What is the best shoe for me?” or “What type of shoe should I wear?”  Although I think these last two questions are valid and are more pertinent to this article than the question, “Are my shoes cute?” I think the latter question may need to be re-phrased. The question more appropriately should be, “What type of shoe shouldn’t I wear?”

There are likely multiple shoes out there that will do well for a particular runner. As you are aware we are all unique individuals, including our feet and running gait. Shoe companies have had a big impact on what a runner will choose to wear for their running shoe; the newest model, the cutest patterns or colors, the type of shoe for your foot type, what the current fastest professional is wearing, etc.  Through the years you have probably seen changes in shoes, and some shoes have had drastic differences. On one side you have the extra thick Hoka and on the other side you have the thin Vibram five finger shoe (or even no shoe at all). The scope of this article is to talk about different aspects to consider when choosing a running shoe and how to use your shoes to your advantage. Read More….

Google Buzz

Whats with Altitude Training

By: Jason Blackham

Imagine yourself running a trail along a trickling stream in the mountains.  It is a bright sunny day with a few white clouds in the deep blue sky.  The flowers in the meadows flash brilliant color.  However, you can hardly enjoy it because you feel like your heart is pounding out of your chest and you are panting worse than a dog as you go up the ridge.  You can’t enjoy it until you stop at the top to see the vista.  As you stop, you think to yourself, at what altitude should I be training?

Much research has been done to determine optimum elevation for training to enhance performance.  The model that has been shown to be best is to live high and train low.  The premier initial studies were performed with athletes living in Park City and training in Salt Lake compared to living and training in Park City and those living and training in San Diego.  It was found that living in Park City and training in Salt Lake increased performance the best.  Athletes train with altitude by high altitude training camps, living at higher altitude and training at lower altitude or by sleeping in tents that simulate higher altitude such as at the Nike training camp.

Without getting into too much physiology, exposure to high altitudes over time increases red blood cells thereby increasing hemoglobin, the molecule that transports oxygen in the blood.  Other things change as well such as a molecule called 2, 3 bisphosphonate which aids in unloading oxygen from hemoglobin.  There are increases in blood vessels in muscle and probably changes in mitochondria energy uses as well.  All of these changes occur due to extreme elevation changes causing a low oxygen state.  It is why traveling to sea level from Utah feels like you can run forever or traveling to high in the mountains feels like you get winded.   Read More….

Google Buzz

Trail Running Can Prevent Injuries. Say What!?

by: Janae Richardson

When we think about the topic of injury prevention a lot of things come to mind…icing, massage, foam rollers, strengthening exercises, etc.  What if I told you trail running could also be added to this injury prevention list? Say what!?  I know right now you are picturing rolling your ankle, tripping over a rock or root, falling off a steep cliff, or running into a rattle snake.  While these are all possible risks of trail running, one could contend that while running on the roads you could just as easily trip over a curb or pothole, get bit by a dog, or even hit by a car.  The truth is, trail running has some definite injury prevention benefits and here’s why…

Read More….

Google Buzz

Feeling Overly Fatigued When Running? Low Iron or Vitamin D May Be The Culprit.

by Jason Blackham

Do you have excessive fatigue with your running? If you do, you should consider seeing a physician to have blood work done.  The most common causes of fatigue in athletes is poor nutrition, sleep problems, underlying medical problems, iron deficiency, and Vitamin D deficiency.  When seeing patients experiencing fatigue, I usually check a panel of labs to look for underlying causes as well. In this article, I will address iron deficiency and Vitamin D deficiency.  

Low Iron Levels

One of the most common underlying reasons for fatigue in athletes is low iron levels.  When iron levels are low for long enough, anemia or low red blood cell counts result.  However, one can be iron deficient without having anemia.  Anemia is most common in women athletes during the ages of menstruation due to loss of blood with menstrual cycles combined with not having enough iron in the diet.  Other major causes include bleeding usually in the GI tract, stomach or bowel, and not enough iron in the diet as well as other medical problems.  

Read More….

Google Buzz
by on Jun.01, 2017, under Nutrition, Utah Running

Join The UtahRunning.com Racing Team

Unless you’re still in high school or college, the opportunity to be a part of a running team is hard to find.  For us, some of our favorite running experiences have more to do with the teammates or the people we experienced them with than with the actual running we did.  Our time spent on teams has shown that being a part of a group can help bring out the best in an individual as each member strives to help contribute to the goals of the whole team.  There is something about being a part of something bigger than ourselves that gives us a sense of purpose, direction, and belonging.  And, let’s face it; running with others makes it a heck of a lot more fun to pound that pavement (or trail)!

For the last couple of years UtahRunning.com has put together an Elite Racing Team.  We’ve been blow away with how much fun being on a team has been and how much having others to race and train with has helped take team members’ race performance to the next level.

That is why in 2016, in addition to our Elite Racing Team, we are creating a racing team for individuals that are looking to be a part of something A-M-A-Z-I-N-G…The UtahRunning.com Racing Team!!

If you are interested in joining our
UtahRunning.com Racing Team,
Here are the requirements:

Submit a race result time (5k, 10k, half marathon, marathon) that is in the 70th percentile or above when age-graded (race result must be within the last two years)
— “How do I know if my race result is in the 70th percentile or above when age-graded?”… Go to this Age-Grade Calculator to calculate your result (http://www.heartbreakhill.org/age_graded.htm)

Willing to participate in at least 6 Utah races throughout the year wearing the highly visible, super-duper fast looking, UtahRunning.com Racing Tank

Pay Team Fee of $20

Team Application:
To apply to be a part of the UtahRunning.com Racing Team fill out the application below…
UtahRunning.com 2016 Racing Team Application

What are the benefits of being on the team?

 Technical Racing Tank

 Camaraderie among teammates, support system, motivation to perform to the best of your ability to help achieve the goals of the team

 Access to advice from Elite Team Members via Facebook Group Page

 Recognition, notoriety, and the opportunity to represent a group that holds themselves to a high standard

 Opportunity to participate in team activities and group runs

 Opportunity to attend the Kick-off Party and End of Year Awards Banquet

 Discounted pricing for UtahRunning.com races and Free entrance into UtahRunning.com clinics

Join UtahRunning.com Racing Team today and prepare yourself for the FUN and SUCCESS you will find as you rub shoulders with the best running/racing group Utah has to offer!

UtahRunning.com 2016 Racing Team Application

Google Buzz

Can Runners Benefit from The Paleo Diet?

CAN RUNNERS BENEFIT FROM A PALEO DIET?

By Rodney Hansen

In my first article of Return of a Has Been Runner, my fifth tip addressed adequate nutrition and avoiding fad diets, detox, and restrictive diets.  A popular restrictive diet that many runners are trying is Paleolithic Nutrition, the Paleo Diet, or the “Caveman Diet.”  The basis of this diet is that the present day human needs to eat like our ancestors did 10,000 years ago.

The basic claim of Paleolithic Nutrition is that we humans are not designed or have not evolved to eat the present day foods, especially foods produced through conventional farming.  Read More….

Google Buzz
by on Dec.07, 2015, under Utah Running


Get Instant Online Access to the Latest Issue of Run Utah Magazine!!!
Plus Receive Weekly
Email Updates
of all
the Upcoming Running
Races in Utah.
Enter your Name and Email
below to receive your
FREE subscription:

We respect your privacy.
We will never share, sell or rent your details.

Privacy Verified