Hello. Join Utahrunning.com, it’s FREE | Sign in | Sign in

Your Run Starts Here!

Ice Bucket Challenge – Runners have been doing this for years!

ice-bucket-challenge-jpg

The Ice Bucket Challenge!

While we don’t want to downplay the widespread participation in the Ice Bucket Challenge or the fact that the ALS Association has been able to raise 100 million dollars (a 3,500% increase from the $2.8 million ALS was able to raise during the same period of time last year), we do take pride in the fact that runners once again are able to “one-up” the average person.  While people are dumping buckets of ice water over their heads and experiencing the cold rush for a minute or so, runners for years have been participating in ICE BATHS where we immerse our bodies up to our chests in ice water for 10-15 minutes!

Mo-Farah-ice-bath

So what are the benefits of ice baths for runners and what are the best conditions for an ice bath…

Benefits of an Ice Bath

  • reduces inflammation and muscle soreness following an intense workout
  • reduces the drop in performance that follows a hard, long, or fast workout

What are the best conditions for an ice bath

  • MOST EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY AFTER WORKOUT
  • STAND IN DEEP WATER. The bulk of the advantage from ice baths actually seems to come from the water pressure not the cold water temperature, so the best way to do an ice bath is if you can stand in a pool, lake, or river.  Although less beneficial (because of less water pressure), sitting in a fairly shallow tub is better than nothing and will still provide some benefit.
  • TEMPERATURE OF WATER BETWEEN 50-59 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT
  • DURATION: 10-15 MINUTES

So while we’ll show our support with the Fad of the Ice Bucket Challenge, us runners will continue to do what we’ve always done and utilize ice baths as a recovery tool!

Google Buzz

Core Muscle Exercises

WE ARE ONLY AS STRONG AS OUR WEAKEST LINK!!

Sometimes we put so much focus on getting in the miles, the intense workouts, the long runs, and eating right, that sometimes we neglect to strengthen the area of our body that is going to carry us through all the training and across that finish line. Our core is our foundation. If we don’t spend a little time on strengthening our core muscles 2-3 times a week an injury will find us. 

So check out this video from our friends at Mountain Land Physical Therapy. It contains a few simple core exercises that can easily and quickly be implemented into your training program. 

Google Buzz

IT Band Friction Syndrome – When Knee Pain Comes From the Hip

 

What is the IT Band?

The iliotibial band (IT band) is a very thick, fibrous band of tissue that runs from the outside of your hip down the outside of your leg and connects on the outside of your knee.  Your glutes, hip abductor and tensor fasciae latae (TFL) muscles all connect into this band.

 

leg image

What is IT Band Friction Syndrome (ITBFS)?

A sudden increase in mileage (over a 5% increase in one week) or excessive downhill running can cause the IT band to rub and create friction on the outside of the knee creating pain.  Since the IT band has fibers that also connects into the outside portion of the kneecap this can also be a source of pain at the front of the knee.

What Causes ITBFS?

Remember Newton’s 3rd Law of motion that “every action has an equal & opposite reaction?”  During running, every time our foot hits the ground with a certain amount of force the same amount of force is also exerted from the ground back up through our foot and into our leg.  If the musculature involved (usually the muscles on the outside of the hip) cannot contend with these increased impact and force requirements, then the body can start to break down and often times this occurs at the knee.  A rapid increase in running distance, downhill running, or running on slanted or graded surfaces (the same side of the road every run) forces the legs to undergo a significant increase in impact and force.

How Do I Fix It?

Decreasing your mileage temporarily until your symptoms subside then increasing more gradually sometimes can help initially.  Increasing your cadence (steps per minute) can help because it decreases the time your foot is on the ground, limiting the returning force the ground can exert back.  There is research data to indicate runners with ITBFS may have weaker hip muscle strength on the affected side.  So strengthening those muscles on the outside of your hip is KEY and is very simple with performing either, or both of the following exercises (to be performed every other day at 3 sets of 10 or 15 reps):

exercises

The following stretches after your run will also be helpful to loosen those tissues & muscles on the outside of your hip holding each stretch for 30-45 seconds, 3 times daily:

stretches

HAPPY RUNNING!

bret-maiers-sm

BRET MAIERS, PT, DPT, OCS

Bret Maiers received his Doctorate degree in physical therapy from Eastern Washington University in 2010.  He is a board certified orthopaedic clinical specialist through the American Physical Therapy Association and is currently the clinic director for Mountain Land Physical Therapy at their Stansbury Park location. In his spare time Bret enjoys running and both watching and playing sports.

Google Buzz

Turning 50 and losing 40 – My journey into Running


by Kathryn Macleod
Turning fifty, is a milestone. For me it was huge. I admit to being quite vain and also to fighting getting older.
I wanted the day to pass without ceremony and attention. A few days after my July 12, 2012 Birthday, I took a trip to Vegas with my husband and another couple.
The celebration was to begin with a shopping expedition. I had this visual image of what I would look like in my special new outfit. I spent far too much money, but purchased what I thought was the perfect outfit.
That evening my husband took some pictures of me. I distinctly remember looking at the pictures and this huge lump came in my throat.
I was not “fat” but I was certainly quite chubby. I actually cried. That same weekend, my husband took a picture of me on my horse. Another weepy moment and another eye opener.
I had to do something. What could I do to change my lifestyle?

 

Las Vegas 2012
Las Vegas July 2012

 

Riding Horse 2012
Riding my horse Winston

 

I have always been an active person. I teach dressage riding professionally (think ballet on horseback), I ride many horses a day, muck stalls, lug hay, and do all sorts of manual labor.
I grew up in Prince Edward Island, Canada and studied Education at a university. I competed with my horses and my riding students at a very competitive level — coaching students to represent Canada in North American competitions.
How did this active person let the pounds just gradually slip on? I had done the diet thing many times…diet down for a vacation south…only to gain it back.
I was hitting middle age and for the first time ever…I was gaining weight on my middle. I weighed 167 pounds.
Social media intervened and so did the era of the “app”. I saw someone post on Facebook about a program called C25k [couch to 5k]. I googled it. Interesting, I thought, perhaps this is what I needed to do?
In August of 2012, I downloaded the “app” on my phone and I created a Facebook page called “Let’s Get Fit c25k”. I convinced several friends to take on the challenge with me.
I then put on whatever running shoes I had and ventured out my door.I did not know it, but my life was about to change.
Google Buzz

Get Instant Online Access to the Latest Issue of Run Utah Magazine!!!
Plus Receive Weekly
Email Updates
of all
the Upcoming Running
Races in Utah.
Enter your Name and Email
below to receive your
FREE subscription:

We respect your privacy.
We will never share, sell or rent your details.

Privacy Verified