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STOP THE OFF-SEASON EATING INSANITY


Doesn’t it make sense that if you change your training, then you should change your eating? The normal winter habit of “taking a break from training” by dropping volume, reducing intensity AND eating the same or MORE carbohydrate is killing your race season performance. STOP THE INSANITY! The pursuit of optimal health and human performance is a year round endeavor!

Never fear, for a typical age group endurance athlete training less than 10 hours a week in the warmer months, this isn’t as drastic as it sounds. The key is realizing that your carbohydrate needs drop when your workout volume drops. Also, as long as you’re doing strength work twice a week and some speed in the winter (you are doing both of these right?) then your protein and fats stay the same or even increase a bit.  Another way to understand this idea is that you have to keep your training and nutritional focus on anabolic, muscle and health building, overdrive. That means training for strength, speed and power and eating meals that keep your insulin stable and kick your hormone system into that anabolic state of rebuilding lost muscle tissue, burning fat and boosting your immune system.

Here are some simple nutritional guidelines to help you achieve this optimal off-season flux:

Guidelines

  • Protein: Consume high quality non-denatured (not destroyed) lean protein 5-6 times a day.  Eat enough to equal 1 gram protein/lb of lean mass a day. Protein should be the first macronutrient you are concerned with.  This quantity is for those of you actually lifting and/or doing speed. Eat less if you are not doing these activities.
  • Fat: Eat fat to lose fat, boost anabolic hormones and stabilize insulin. Eat omega 3 based fats with most meals. Put flax seed or mixed plant oil into at least 1 or 2 protein shakes a day. 1 TBS /50 lbs of bodyweight/day is the maintenance dose.  Double if you have joint or inflammation problems
  • Carbs: refuel muscle tissue properly right after workout so you don’t starve later! Recovery drink or shake within 30 minutes of workout. Within the next 60-90 minutes eat a solid meal with an extra serving or two of dense carbs like fruit, yams, squash, red potatoes.  All other meals only require one serving of carbohydrate, if any! Daily intake of at least 90% produce based carbs with no more than 10% whole grain!  Eat a big dark green salad everyday.
  • Fluids and fiber: drink half your bodyweight in ounces of water a day. That does not include during and post workout fluid. Take a fiber supplement once or twice a day with meals (although not before a run!)
  • Meals: Focus on protein and produce and some fats like olive oil, nuts, sharp cheese to feel fully satisfied. Eat until you are full. Eat extra carbs only after workouts.

 

 

Benefits

  • Each protein dose, when accompanied by a small amount of low glycemic carbs, releases growth hormone and glucagon (the opposite of insulin). This sets up the body to burn fat throughout the day.
  • Metabolic efficiency! The focus on protein, fats and produce teach the body to live off its own carbs stores and finally burn fat more easily because it has to.  This transfers over to being able to burn fat longer and in greater quantities in training during longer and slower workouts when you add them in later. SWEET!
  • Your insulin becomes more stable, sensitive and efficient so your body doesn’t need as much of it as it used to in order to process carbs.
  • Feel more satiated, recover better from workouts, improve sense of health and wellbeing dramatically, don’t get sick much, strongly curbs carb cravings and you sleep better.

 

The goal

The smartest athletes will use the off-season as a time to rebuild their bodies. After 4-8 weeks of resting, then eating and training in an anabolic pattern will get the body lean, mean and ready for a full season of specific endurance work. Cheers to a wise winter!

 

by Debbie Perry

Certified Sports Nutrition Advisor

USA Triathlon Certified Coach

Colgan Power Program Strength Trainer

Local Elite Runner/Triathlete

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This entry was posted on Thursday, February 24th, 2011 at 4:13 pm and is filed under Nutrition, Sports Medicine, Training, Utah Running, Winter Running. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.

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