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Tim Speicher

Tim Speicher – PhD | Athletic Trainer | Strength and Conditioning Specialist | Positional Release Therapist | Biomechanist – Gait Analysis

Dr. Tim Speicher, PhD, ATC, LAT, CSCS, PRT is an Athletic Trainer (AT), Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) and Certified Positional Release Therapist (PRT). He completed his B.S. at Towson University in 1995 and received his graduate training from Marshall University in 1998. In 2010, he completed his doctoral degree in Adult Learning from the University of Connecticut. Dr. Speicher has worked in a variety of clinical environments with various populations and age groups. These have included amateur, high school, collegiate, in and outpatient rehabilitation, industrial and Olympic settings. Dr. Speicher has gained a majority of his clinical experience with Division I athletics, including track and field and soccer. Most notably, he served as a Medical Supervisor for the 2002 Winter Olympic Games for Long Track Speed Skating. He is founder and owner of the Positional Release Therapy Institute, a company that provides positional release therapy and gait analysis for patients and instruction, training and certification in positional release therapy for health care practitioners. Dr. Speicher’s clinical expertise and research is in positional release therapy, therapeutic modalities, biomechanical or gait analysis, orthotic prescription and fabrication, pedagogy and transfer of learning. He has published and presented his work nationally and internationally. Dr. Speicher has been a competitive runner, collegiate athlete and is currently a competitive cyclist for a team in Utah. He enjoys skiing, mountaineering and rock and ice climbing in his free time.

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by on Jun.03, 2015, under Utah Running

Rodney Hansen

Rodney Hansen – Exercise Physiologist | Ph. D. in Nutritional Sciences | Runner | Coach

Rodney has been a distance runner since junior high.  He graduated from Fort Collins High School in Fort Collins, Colorado and earned his Bachelor’s degree from Idaho State University where he was also a cross country, indoor, and outdoor track athlete.  He completed both his Master’s Degree in Exercise Physiology and Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Nutritional Sciences from Colorado State University.

Rod’s former professional experience includes coaching high school Boys and Girls Track (Poudre School District, Fort Collins, Colorado), and collegiate Mens and Womens Cross Country, Indoor Track, Outdoor Track, and Marathon (College of Southern Idaho).  He also conducted research in nutrition in the Colorado State University Veterinary Medicine Program where he primarily investigated dietary omega-3 fatty acids and the effect they have on chronic disease in companion animals.

Rod has been a professor at Weber State University since 2004.  He teaches nutrition and his research interests have included biomechanical analysis of barefoot running in elite runners and nutrient intervention to address muscle soreness in older runners.  He is married to Julie Hansen.

 

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by on Jun.03, 2015, under Utah Running Experts

Julie Hansen

Julie Hansen

Julie Hansen – Masters of Science | Sports Dietitian | Exercise Physiologist | Runner

Julie Hansen, M.S., R.D., C.D. is a Registered Dietitian and Exercise Physiologist.  Julie graduated from Kansas State University with a degree in Dietetics and from Colorado State University with a Master’s degree in Exercise Science.  Julie moved to Utah in 2004 from Fort Collins, Colorado.  Julie is married to Rodney and has two children, Russelle who is 18 and Isaac who is 15.

Julie has been involved in athletics since junior high school.  She played basketball, volleyball and track in high school.  Julie has been running competitively in road races since 1980 and competing in triathlons since 2005.   Julie has competed in the Huntsman World Senior Games in Track and Field and the Triathlon.

Julie currently teaches a Sports Nutrition course for Weber State University and a Weight Management course for the University of Utah.  Julie is the dietitian for the Weber State Athletic department.  Julie also has a private nutrition practice in Utah working with individuals who want to lose weight, improve performance, lower cholesterol or prevent disease.  Julie is able to help endurance athletes customize their daily training diets and provide race day nutrition plans for marathon or ironman competitions.  In the corporate wellness field, Julie works part time as a dietitian for Kimberly Clark Corporation in Ogden, Utah and for Solstice Residential Treatment Center in Layton, Utah.  Julie was the President of the Utah Dietetic Association in 2011-2012.

 

 

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by on Jun.03, 2015, under Utah Running Experts

Ice Bucket Challenge – Runners have been doing this for years!

ice-bucket-challenge-jpg

The Ice Bucket Challenge!

While we don’t want to downplay the widespread participation in the Ice Bucket Challenge or the fact that the ALS Association has been able to raise 100 million dollars (a 3,500% increase from the $2.8 million ALS was able to raise during the same period of time last year), we do take pride in the fact that runners once again are able to “one-up” the average person.  While people are dumping buckets of ice water over their heads and experiencing the cold rush for a minute or so, runners for years have been participating in ICE BATHS where we immerse our bodies up to our chests in ice water for 10-15 minutes!

Mo-Farah-ice-bath

So what are the benefits of ice baths for runners and what are the best conditions for an ice bath…

Benefits of an Ice Bath

  • reduces inflammation and muscle soreness following an intense workout
  • reduces the drop in performance that follows a hard, long, or fast workout

What are the best conditions for an ice bath

  • MOST EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY AFTER WORKOUT
  • STAND IN DEEP WATER. The bulk of the advantage from ice baths actually seems to come from the water pressure not the cold water temperature, so the best way to do an ice bath is if you can stand in a pool, lake, or river.  Although less beneficial (because of less water pressure), sitting in a fairly shallow tub is better than nothing and will still provide some benefit.
  • TEMPERATURE OF WATER BETWEEN 50-59 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT
  • DURATION: 10-15 MINUTES

So while we’ll show our support with the Fad of the Ice Bucket Challenge, us runners will continue to do what we’ve always done and utilize ice baths as a recovery tool!

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Running 101: 4 Lessons for Every Runner

Well, it’s back to school again. The time of year when we do our back to school shopping and our back to homework routines. We’re already seeing everyone posting pictures on Facebook of their kids first day of school. With furthering our education and intellect on our minds we have a few important lessons to teach you about running…

LESSON #1: IF YOU RUN YOU ARE A RUNNER

LESSON #2: SUCK IT UP

LESSON #3: RUNNING IS A GREAT FAMILY ACTIVITY

LESSON #4: IT’S ALL WORTH IT

 

 

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by on Aug.21, 2014, under Motivation

Rehydration: The Key to Peak Performance During and After Exercise

 

by Julie Hansen, M.S., R.D., C.D.

Proper fluid replacement before, during, and after exercise can positively influence how you feel and how you perform.  Most people do not realize how quickly water can be lost from our bodies when exercising.  The heat production rate in active, exercising muscles can be 100 times that of resting muscles.

On the average, the body loses more than two liters of water each day through perspiration, urine, feces and respiration.  During exercise, sweat losses of up to three liters/hour are common.  Technically, dehydration occurs when body water loss equals one percent of body mass (performance is affected at a fluid loss of two percent).  For example, a 150 pound person becomes dehydrated after losing one and one-half to three pounds of body weight.

Thirst is an unreliable indicator of fluid needs after exercising in hot weather, partly because the intake of water quickly dulls the thirst sensation.  Further, rehydration with plain water dilutes the blood rapidly and stimulates an increase in urine production that leads to greater dehydration.

Rehydration will occur more rapidly when beverages containing sodium (the major electrolyte lost in sweat), are consumed.  Ingesting a beverage containing sodium allows the plasma sodium to remain elevated during the rehydration period and helps maintain thirst while delaying stimulation of urine production.  The rehydration beverage should also contain glucose or sucrose because these carbohydrates provide a source of energy for working muscles, stimulate fluid absorption in the gut, and improve beverage taste.

 

The following guidelines will help athletes maintain proper hydration during practice and competition:

 

  • Weigh in without clothes before and after exercise, especially during hot     weather.  For each pound of body weight lost during exercise, drink 2   cups of fluid.
  • Consume a sports drink containing sodium to quickly replenish lost body fluids.  The beverage should contain 5-8% glucose or sucrose.
  • Drink 2.5 cups of fluid two hours before practice or competition.
  • Drink 1.5 cups of fluid 15 minutes before the event.
  • Drink at least 1 cup of fluid every 15-20 minutes during training and competition.
  • Limit beverages containing caffeine and alcohol because they increase urine production and add to dehydration.

 

Try your own homemade sports drink:

5% Carbohydrate:

4 Tbs. sugar

4 cups water

1/8 tsp. salt

2 Tbls. lemon juice

 

6.5% Carbohydrate:

5 Tbs. sugar

4 cups water

1/8 tsp. salt

2 Tbls. lemon juice

Julie Hansen

Julie Hansen, M.S., R.D., C.D. is a Registered Dietitian and Exercise Physiologist.  She has been running competitively in road races since 1980 and competing in triathlons since 2005.  Julie currently teaches a Sports Nutrition course for Weber State University and a Weight Management course for the University of Utah.  She is the dietitian for the Weber State Athletic department and works part time as a dietitian for Kimberly Clark Corporation in Ogden, Utah and for Solstice Residential Treatment Center in Layton, Utah.  Julie also has a private nutrition practice in Utah working with individuals who want to lose weight, improve performance, lower cholesterol or prevent disease.

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