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Tips for Training for a Marathon

Expert Panel Question???

“I’m a 62 year old male runner, have run many half marathons but never a full marathon. I run 3 – 4 times a week averaging 25 to 35 miles. I play golf and weight train moderately. I’m training for a marathon and would like to feel more energized – suggestions?”

Answer!!!

Realize that training for a marathon at any age is an energy draining pursuit, but to help you feel as good as possible try the following:

1. Keep your run days to 3-4 times a week
2. Keep your weekday runs to no more than an hour.
3. Do long runs every other Saturday and start them about 16 weeks out(assuming you already can run 90 minutes for a long run)
4. Do your longest training run at 22 miles and do it 3 weeks out from your race.
5. Focus on eating really well after all your runs. Drink a recovery drink IMMEDIATELY upon finishing a run and then eat a whole food meal within 45-60 minutes following that has a lot of carbohydrates, lean protein and healthy fat.
6. Drink lots of water each day.
7. Sleep really well.
8. Use a sports massage therapist twice a month
9. Take a solid vitamin/mineral/ antioxidant supplement day and night.
10. Take an ice bath after each long run.

by Debbie Perry

Certified Sports Nutrition Advisor

USA Triathlon Certified Coach

Colgan Power Program Strength Trainer

Local Elite Runner/Triathlete

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How does extra weight effect race performance?

Expert Panel Question???

“I have gained 30 pounds since my last 10k or 5k, how does extra weight effect race performance?”

Answer!!!

If the gained weight is only fat, then the most obvious effect that weight gain will have on performance is the impending slow down in pace due to the effort it takes to move the extra weight down the road. In general, for extra fat weight, then one can expect to slow down about a second per mile per pound. So for every 10 pounds in fat someone is carrying, they will run 10 seconds or so a mile slower than before given the same effort. The extra body fat also throws the body’s hydration and cooling mechanisms out of wack, so one must take that into consideration as well.

However, if a runner has added some functional muscle tissue, then that won’t be the case. For some individuals, adding 5 lbs of muscle helps their running. They run faster, have healthier immune systems and recover faster. It is recommended, for those not racing at very elite levels, to push for maintaining functional muscle tissue as part of their year round fitness routine. Not that elites don’t need muscle tissue, but they do have to whittle down to the bare minimum. Everyone else can and should carry more.

Read More….

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What should I eat before a race?

Pre-Race Nutrition

After all the training that has been done leading up to your big event, the last mistake you would want to make race morning is with your pre race nutrition.   There are some athletes who decide that they want to skip all the confusion and try not eating.  While this may work for a morning 5K, it gets more risky with a 10K and down right nonsense for a half-marathon/marathon or triathlon.  There have been several studies done that repeatedly show substantial increases in performance with proper fueling before an event.  In addition to increasing performance and topping off glycogen (energy) stores, a pre race meal will also help avoid hunger, stabilize blood sugar (especially in those who are sugar sensitive), hydrate the body, still leave your stomach empty by race time and help prevent gastrointestinal distress when done correctly.  So in other words, you will feel and perform better.  The key is to customize your eating habit based on your weight, race distance and food sensitivities.

Here are some basic guidelines to follow for a pre-race morning:

  1. Consume .5-1 gram of carbs per lb of body weight the morning of race[i].  For longer races stick to the 1 gram/lb. At least half of it in solid food eaten no later than 2 hours before the race.  The rest of the requirement can be taken in the form of a pre race hydration drink (see below) between 90-30 minutes prior to start time. There are some extra sensitive people that can only do liquids the morning of and that is OK(especially for short, less than 40 minutes, and high intensity racing) Some people keep a packet of gel to take 10-15 minutes before if they can tell they need a little more, so carry one just in case.
  2. Choose a solid food meal that is low to moderate in glycemic value. This is a key piece that will help keep your blood sugar stable before and during the race.  One reason some people feel hungry right before the start is that their pre event breakfast was way to high in simple sugars (i.e.: fruit loops, white breads, candy.) which caused a hypoglycemic reaction. People seem to be more sensitive to this blood sugar drop on race day.  With a lower glycemic meal, a steady stream of fuel will be released into the muscle during the first part of the race and allow your body to wait until later to use the other carbs you have stored up in the days before.
  3. Avoid high fat and high protein meals. This will slow down the absorption of carbs too much and then you end up trying to race on a full stomach. Yuck! That would be a gastrointestinal disaster. Some “lighter” protein is OK in order to reduce the glycemic index of a meal and make it “stick.” Acceptable protein would be eggs or whey protein, which are both easily digestible.
  4. Keep the fiber intake low. This would not be good time for a bean burrito. No explanation needed, ehh?
  5. Drink 12-24 oz. of fluid, stopping about 30 min. before race start. If you eat mostly solid food, then your fluid choice will be water.  But for some athletes, some or all fluids will be in the form of a hydration drink.

Read More….

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Debbie Perry – Utah Running Expert

Debbie Perry         Certified Sports Nutrition Advisor

USA Triathlon Certified Coach

Colgan Power Program Strength Trainer

Local Elite Runner/Triathlete

Debbie has been running since 1984.  She was both a high school and collegiate distance runner.  She competed in track and cross country for Weber State University where she graduated with a Bachelors degree in Physics Teaching.  In 2003 she became certified as a Colgan Power Program Strength Trainer.  In 2005 Debbie became a USA Triathlon Certified Coach and a Certified Sports Nutrition Advisor (CSNA-Master).  Today, Debbie is still a competitive runner and has become a successful triathlete as well.

Athletic Accomplishments:

Big Sky conference outdoor track champion in 3000 meter.

Participated in the 1991 NCAA Div.1 Cross Country National Championship

Ranked #1 in the USA Triathlon rankings for the 35-39 age group in 2005

Multiple time age group All-American Triathlete

Multiple time age group World Championship qualifier at the Olympic and
Ironman 70.3 distances.

Debbie’s General Training Philosophy:

“Running is the purest sport there is.  It will always be my most favorite form of exercise as nothing else makes me feel as free and alive.”

“If I am going to make a mistake I choose to be slightly undertrained.  This keeps me injury free, refreshed, always improving and ready to race!”

A former military brat, Debbie moved to Ogden in 1988 to run at WSU.  She fell in love with the mountains and with her husband (Guy) and stayed in Ogden.  She is the mother of three boys and 2 girls and is “the not so silent ‘silent’ partner at Salt Lake Running Co.”

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by on Jan.01, 2010, under Utah Running Experts


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