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Beginning Runner Training

Expert Panel Questions???

“I have never been a runner I am out of shape and attempting to train for a half marathon I am just now starting should I focus on keeping up a faster pace for shorter time or go for distance with a slower pace?”

(ask your questions to the UtahRunning.com Experts)

Answer!!!

If you’re just starting out as a first-time runner, you should make the establishment of a consistent training program your first priority. Find thirty minutes each day (six days each week, if possible) to set aside for your training. Don’t worry about pace or distance at first. In fact, you may need to do a combination of walking and running in order to get through thirty minutes. Before long, if you are consistent, you’ll be able to run comfortably for thirty minutes each day. As that begins to feel easy, add time to some (not all) of your weekly runs and see how your body responds to the increased workload.

Try not to skip days unless you need to recover from an injury. Instead, learn to listen to your body, running faster on days that you feel good and easy on days that you need to recover. Not every day should be a hard day. Besides keeping you healthy, this is important for your enjoyment of the sport. If you begin to dread the difficulty of a normal run, you’re working too hard.

If you’re a beginning runner training for a half marathon, you’ll eventually want to work a long run into your schedule once each week. This long run should be about 10-12 miles and should constitute about 20-25% of your weekly mileage. For example, if you run 10 miles on Saturday morning, you should average at least six miles each of the other five days for a total weekly mileage of 40.

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Foot Pain! What’s Wrong?

Expert Panel Questions???

“12 Days before Marathon, I have had pain on the bottom of my foot (arch area) for about 1 week. I am stressing mentally :) Any suggestions on what I should do would be appreciated.”

“I ran a half marathon the other day. About 12 hours after I finished, the outside of my foot started hurting. It’s the bottom of the foot on the opposite side of the arch. It has not stopped hurting since, especially when I walk. What is this?”

(ask your questions to the UtahRunning.com Experts here)

Answer!!!

The short answer to these two questions may be accumulated stress from training at increased intensity and volume of marathon preparation. Damage done to your tissues has exceeded your body’s ability to recover and heal itself. These issues are discussed in “Why does my heel hurt during the power phase of training?” Mechanics out of alignment or a worn-out or improper shoe may exacerbate stresses on the foot. Consider revisiting my article on how to select the correct running shoe.

Regarding why the lateral side of the foot is sore after a run–The short answer here is that you are running on the lateral side of your foot. You may have a cavus (high arch) foot and naturally run on the lateral side of your foot. Running in a stability shoe or using a rigid, high-arch orthotic will make you run more on the lateral side of your foot. Alternatively, you may have a planus (low arch) foot. In this case your shoe may not have enough stability and your posterior tibial tendon may be sore. Your body then tries to protect the posterior tibial tendon by activating the anterior tibial tendon, which inverts the foot and causes you to run on the lateral side of your foot.

Revisit the running shoe article and think hard about what type of foot you have. If pain is not improving, you may have a stress fracture, and you should seek treatment and have an xray.

By Jeffrey Rocco, M.D. Rocco Foot and Ankle Institute 801-644-8795

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What are the essentials for a 10k trail run?

Nutritionally, it is important to make sure you fuel adequately for the time you will be running, not for the distance. Trail races can be significantly slower than road races. If possible, run the course before you race it. If you don’t have an opportunity to run it, look on-line for any course elevation profiles, photos, or descriptions that are available. Also look at race times from previous years to determine a realistic pace that you can expect to run. Race duration will determine whether a pre-race meal is sufficient to meet your energy needs, or if you need to bring something along for mid-race refueling. Refer to Debbie Perry’s article on pre-race nutrition for more details.

As for equipment, it’s important to be prepared for a variety of conditions. Just like any outdoor race, you should bring layered, synthetic clothing for hot or cold, wet or dry weather. Unlike the road or track, however, you also need to prepare for highly variable terrain. Trail conditions can deteriorate overnight with a sudden storm. Bring shoes for any scenario you can reasonably anticipate. Here in the Mountain West, trail racers or trail trainers are usually sufficient. But if you prefer a lighter, more flexible shoe, there’s nothing wrong with using a road trainer or even a road racing flat on the trails (ideally one with decent traction in the outsole). If you’re on grassy, soft trails like those typically found in the East or Pacific Northwest, it may even be appropriate to wear a cross country or track spike.

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Marathon Training Schedules for an Older Runner

Expert Panel Question???

“There are many training schedules for a marathon but there doesn’t seem to be anything tailored for an older runner. I’m 59 and would like something geared more to me. I just can’t run fast.”

(ask your questions to the UtahRunning.com Experts here)

Answers!!!

Response from Paul Pilkington:

I would follow one of the marathon training programs, but would make some adjustment on the recovery days between hard workouts. As older runners we tend to need more recovery. Once we get over 40 years old we start to lose muscle. Training helps to offset the loss, but an untrained over 40 year old will lose around a pound of muscle a year. As a result, instead of 1 easy day between quality workouts you might need 2 or 3 days. You’ll still run on those recovery days, but don’t be afraid to slow down and listen to your body. If the schedule says go hard on Tuesday and Thursday you might want to experiment with Monday and Thursday to get an extra day of recovery.

Response from Janae Richardson:

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by on Mar.03, 2010, under Expert Answers, Utah Running

UtahRunning.com Press Release

Newly Launched UtahRunning.com Provides a Comprehensive Resource for Runners and Athletes

UtahRunning.com is a new website for running enthusiasts. This online resource features a community for runners as well as a comprehensive resource of races in Utah.

February 5, 2010 Salt Lake City, Utah – UtahRunning.com, officially launched on January 15th 2010, aims to become the premiere destination for Utah runners, athletes and race coordinators. As this new website seeks to encourage more people to run and lead a healthy lifestyle, UtahRunning.com provides useful tools dedicated to all things related to running. Resources include a list of upcoming races in Utah, and an expert panel of doctors, nutritionists, athletes, and coaches who answer questions about running.

UtahRunning.com’s expert panel includes twenty of the top running, fitness and health experts in all of Utah. Web visitors can ask their running related questions and get quality, informative answers. These experts include Olympic athlete Lindsay Anderson, who qualified for the 2008 Olympics in Bejing and represented the US in two World Championship events in Osaka and Berlin. Other experts include Paul Pilkington who is the Weber State University Head Distance Coach and Steve Scharmann who is a Sports Medicine physician currently practicing in Ogden.

UtahRunning.com is a centralized destination seeking to provide essential information to tourists and locals alike. In general, Utah is considered to be one of the top states for running enthusiasts. For example, recently, Runner’s World named Utah’s St. George Marathon one of the top four choices for “Marathons to Build a Vacation Around.” Further, Runner’s World ranked this marathon as one of the “10 Most Scenic and Fastest Marathon” and “Top 20 Marathons in the USA.” Running competitions take place year-round throughout the state in areas including Moab, Bryce Canyon, Zion, Canyonlands, as well as the cities of Salt Lake City, Provo, and Ogden. UtahRunning.com welcomes race coordinators and directors to visit the website and submit information about upcoming races in Utah.

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So who answers what? Expert Questions

So who answers what? Expert Questions

When it comes to the questions that people ask the Expert Panel, as a UtahRunning.com team we decide who on our Expert Panel will be best able to answer the question based on their background and expertise.

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